Ni7 Robert Carter Nicholas

    Son of  Dr. George Nicholas Ni8 and Elizabeth Carter widow Burwell Ca8 widow of Nathaniel Burwell.
     
    Born: 28 Jan 1728 in Williamsburg or Fairfield Gloucester Co., Virginia,
    Died: 8 Sep 1780,in Hanover Co Virginia.
    Married 1752 to Anne Cary Ca7

    Nicholas coat of arms
    His son-in-law, Edmund Randolph described Robert Carter Nicholas so:
    "By nature he was benevolent and liberal. But he appeared to many who did not thoroughly understand him, to be haughty and austere; because they could not appreciate the preference of gravity for levity, when in conversation the sacredness of religion was involved in ridicule or language forgot its chastity."

    Robert Carter Nicholas became treasurer upon the death of his 3rd cousin, John Robinson Jr, and discovered the latter owed the treasury 109,000 pounds.

    Robert Carter Nicholas and Anne Cary had Children (not arranged entirely in order of birth):
    Ni6-1 Elizabeth Nicholas b. 11 Aug. 1752; m. 29 Aug. 1776 Gov. Edmund Jennings Randolph, son of John Randolph, 1776; d. 1810.
    Ni6 George Nicholas (11 Aug. 1753 - 27 July 1799), married Mary Smith daughter of John Smith of Baltimore, Md., and moved to Kentucky and was the father of Judge Samuel Smith Nicholas who published a masterful plea for the right of habeas corpus when it was suspended by President Lincoln during the Civil War.
    Ni6-3 Wilson Cary Nicholas (31 January 1761 - 10 October 1820) married 1783 Margaret, daughter of John Smith of Baltimore, Md.,
    Ni6-4 John Nicholas (1756 - 31 Dec. 1819 ),  married Anne Lawson, was member of Congress 1793 - ¬1801; removed to Geneva, New York, where he has numerous descendants.
    Ni6-5 Sarah Nicholas, b. 1752 at Frederick Co., VA m John Hatley Norton son of John Norton and Courtenay Walker.
    Ni6-6 Judith Nicholas (1765 - '1 )
    Ni6-7 Lewis Nicholas (1766 - '/ ), who lived in Albemarle.
    Ni6-8 Robert Carter Nicholas  (2 June 1768 - 7 ) m 27 Jul 1801 Martha Mosby b: ABT 1770 in Powhatan, Virginia and had John S. Nicholas b: 11 DEC 1803 in of "Seven Islands", Cumberland, VA
    Ni6-9 Philip Norborne Nicholas (1775 - 1849) m1 Mary Spear of Baltimore, Md m2 Maria Carter Byrd, dau of Thomas Taylor Byrd and Mary Anne Armistead, dau of William Armistead Ar9-4-1-1.
    Ni6-10 Mary Nicholas; b. 1759; d. 1796; unmarried.

     
     

    Robert Carter Nicholas (Ni7) was graduated from William and Mary College. He served in many important posts in the Co1ony and state of Virginia. (Among these  certain of his activities which have been copied from the Register of the Kentucky Society of the Colonial Dames of America, should be checked, as the date
    - of his birth as given there seems impossible.) He was a member of the House of Burgesses from York County, 1756; member of the House of Burgesses from James City County  1765-1775; signer of the Non-Importation Act  1767; member of the Committee of Correspondence, 1773; Chairman of Convention, 1775; Treasurer of Colony  1766 - 1776; First President of Virginia Court of' Appeals; and member of Supreme Court of Virginia, 1778. There is a Treasury note, signed by him at the Filson Club in Louisville, among the items lent to the Club by Mrs. George Nicholas (Ni3-4).

    The house which Robert Carter Nicholas lived in during the sessions at Williamsburg has been known as the Sanders House. It was originally the house where Governor Nicholson lived.
    Robert Carter Nicholas (Ni7) was a statesman, jurist, and patriot, and familiarly known as Treasurer Nicholas in colonial annals, from having long and honorably filled that important office (note from (He1-2): he was more particularly held in such high honor for administrating the estate of his predecessor, who had died suddenly and had been found out by Nicholas for absconding with enormous funds of the colony. Nicholas as receiver of the estate managed the difficult task so well over the course of twenty years that he managed to retrieve all of the stolen money from the estate revenues while avoiding auctioning off his house and turning the man’s poor widow out of the house. This unusual feat of justice and mercy has seldom been equalled. Today any official would immediately liquidate the man’s property at auction and let the speculators reap their profit whether the state suffered ultimate financial disaster and loss of public faith or not. But instead Nicholas straightened things out by holding the scandal to a minimum and discreetly manoeuvring the colony’s precarious finances out of what otherwise would have been bankruptcy onto the firm financial basis that allowed Virginia to take the lead during the revolution.) He married (1752) Anne, daughter of Colonel Wilson and Sarah Cary, third in descent from Colonel Miles Cary, the emigrant ancestor of the family in Virginia who was  born in Bristol, England, in 1620; died June 10th,1667, in Virginia, and fifth in descent from  William Cary, Mayor of Bristol in 1540. (Cary family)

    Robert Carter Nicholas was distinguished at the Bar in Williamsburg, in the House of Burgesses, in the Council, as Treasurer of  the State, and as a patriot in the Revolutionary War. But he had a higher praise than all these offices could give him; for he was a sincere Christian, and a zealous defender of "the Church of his fathers”, when he believed her rights were assailed. Mr. Hugh Blair Grigsby, in his eloquent description of the Burgesses in 1776, thus describes him:

    He loved, indeed a particular form of religion, but he loved more dearly religion itself.

    In peace or war, at the fireside, or on the floor of the House of Burgesses a strong sense of moral responsibi1ity was seen through all his actions. If a resolution appointing a day of fasting and prayer, or acknowledging the providence of God in  crowning our arms with victory, though drawn by worldly men and worldly views, was to be, it was from his hands  that it was to be presented to the House and from his lips came the persuasive words which fell not in vain on the coldest ears. Indeed, such was the impression which his sincere piety – embellishing as it did the sterling virtues of his character – made upon his own generation, that its influence was felt upon that which succeeded it; and when his youngest son, near a quarter of a century after his death, became a candidate for the office of Attorney General of the Commonwealth, a political opponent, who knew neither father nor son gave him his support, declaring that no son of the old Treasurer could be unfaithful to his country. Nor was his piety less conspicuous in a private sphere. Visiting, on one occasion, Lord Botetourt, with whom he lived in the strictest friendship, he observed to that nobleman, “My Lord, I think you will be very unwilling to die.” And when asked what gave rise to that remark: “Because, “ said he, “you are so social in your nature, and so much loved, and have so many good things around you, that you must be loath to leave them." His lordship made no reply; but a short time after, being on his death-bed, he sent in haste for Colonel Nicholas, who 1ived near the palace, and who instantly repaired thither to receive the last sighs of his dying friend. On entering his Cham¬ber, he asked his commands. “Nothing,” replied his lordship, “but to let you see that I resign these good things, of which you formerly spoke, with as much composure as I enjoyed them.. After which he grasped his hand with warmth, and instantly expired.

    Robert Carter Nicholas (Ni7) was a statesman, jurist, and patriot, and familiarly known as Treasurer Nicholas in colonial annals, from having long and honorably filled that important office (note from (He1-2): he was more particularly held in such high honor for administrating the estate of his predecessor, who had died suddenly and had been found out by Nicholas for absconding with enormous funds of the colony. Nicholas as receiver of the estate managed the difficult task so well over the course of twenty years that he managed to retrieve all of the stolen money from the estate revenues while avoiding auctioning off his house and turning the man’s poor widow out of the house. This unusual feat of justice and mercy has seldom been equalled. Today any official would immediately liquidate the man’s property at auction and let the speculators reap their profit whether the state suffered ultimate financial disaster and loss of public faith or not. But instead Nicholas straightened things out by holding the scandal to a minimum and discreetly manoeuvring the colony’s precarious finances out of what otherwise would have been bankruptcy onto the firm financial basis that allowed Virginia to take the lead during the revolution.) He married (1752) Anne, daughter of Colonel Wilson and Sarah Cary, third in descent from Colonel Miles Cary, the emigrant ancestor of the family in Virginia who was  born in Bristol, England, in 1620; died June 10th,1667, in Virginia, and fifth in descent from  William Cary, Mayor of Bristol in 1540. (Cary family)

    Robert Carter Nicholas may also be thanked for bringing forth the fine legal talent of Patrick Henry. For there were four jurists at that time responsible for examing lawyers for admission to the bar, from whom a candidate had to find two to pass him. Patrick Henry picked up a law book one day and decided to become a lawyer. After studying intensively for six weeks he rode off to Williamsburg for his examination. By chance his first attempt to find an examiner got him an interview with Robert Carter Nicholas, who queried his knowledge of law intensely allowing Patrick Henry to bring reasons for his "legal" opinions. Of course, Henry's showing on a knowledge of case law was so poor that there was little basis for passing him. But the old Treasurer was easily convinced of the young man's ability to bring a logically plausible argument for his opinions. So he signed Henry's examination paper admonishing him to read his law books more carely and handed over the document upon Henry's promise to do so. Henry had no luck with the next two trys to be examined, but the fourth, upon hearing of Henry's success with the Old Treasurer, agreed to examine him. He soon came to the same opinion, and Henry was allowed to practice law. And quite right too, as there was a dire need for lawyers in the frontier area where Henry lived.

    But little did these two staunch supporters of the established church know, that Henry's first resounding successs would be defending a man against Rev. Maury's claim for payment of the Tithe. Legally, this was a hopeless case for Henry, for everyone knew full well that the Reverend of the established Anglican Church had an indisputable claim for payment of the tithe, but the frontier area was populated by Presbyterians, Methodists, Baptists etc. all disenclined to pay a Tithe to a church they were not a member of. And nonetheless Henry's defense arguments carried the day, so he became the most popular man all along the frontier and was soon voted Member of the House of Burgesses. Henry more than any single man may be deemed the founder of Democratic Republicanism and the driving force for independence from England.

    Despite his unquestioned support of the Revolutionary War, Robert Carter Nicholas was the only prominent American politician to vote against the adoption of the Declaration of Independence. Perhaps he spoke in the House of Burgesses about why he was against its adoption, but until the recording of this speech can be read, we can only guess and there are two very obvious reasons for this position, surely both carried their weight in his decision:

    First, fighting for rights had long been an honorable tradition in English constitutional law, and his ancestors had certainly done more than their share of fighting to put the English Constitution in place, as would he and his sons even if joining forces with the movement for independence. But declaring independence was to renounce the national unity impersoned in the crown and that was high treason, men of rank lost their heads for it, others were strung up. On the other hand, the Nicholas and Ludlow families had always been more on the Royalist than on the Republican side, only moved to the opposition after atrosities and tyranny had arisen.
    His 2nd great grandfather's fight for the recognition of the Petition of Right as a Member of Parliment in 1639 and thereafter may not have been told to Robert Carter Nicholas by his father or mother, who might not have known about it either. But as a lawyer he had certainly learned of the crystalisation of these rights during the Civil War in England just 130 years earlier, and he is likely to have learned that practicaly all of the M.P. in the Rump Parliament were ultimately hunted down by the Royalist and assassinated. And that the "Cavaliers" went into battle against Cromwell's Roundheads with the order "No quarter given!"
    Second, the legal tenents justifying the Declaration had no basis in positive law. The second half of the eigthteenth century was the age of Voltaire and Rousseau and the high tide of the theory of natural law, which Jefferson adhered to and so eloquently worded in the Declaration of Independence. But the notion of inalienable rights to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness as an absolute freedom stood in contradiction to the laws allowing indenture and slavery. Many immigrants had and were still indenturing themself to years of labor in exchange for payment of their passage. Until imperialism ended the practice of African tribesmen of hunting down their neighbors and selling them as slaves enslavement was to continue to be a scourge of human existance for another 80 years. So slavery was still a strong social institution and still far too devisive an issue to raise a lance for.

    Obviously, Robert Carter Nicholas recognized that this "point of law" would bring on war. If you count the number of his great grandsons who died in the Civil War - fighting on both sides, by the way - or the number of his descendants who suffered losses from it you can begin to understand why he would avoid any declaration that was certain to swear up strife sooner than necessary.

    Slavery like feudalism, royalism, oligarchy, republicanism, tyranny, democracy, mercantilism, imperialism, industrialism, communism, nationalism, socialism globalisation and outsourcing are all social economic institutions that have advantages and/or disadvantages for their time: their advantages thrive with the character and scruples of their executives and fall as scruples decline.

    The right to life, liberty and pursuit of happiness as an absolute and inalienable right is not just the freedom to prosper, but as questionable today as ever; for it is also the freedom to idleness, indolence, self indulgience, alcohol and drugs, against which most states' laws prescribe a type of incarceration called rehabilitation. There is no reason to wish for the return of such a usurious social instituion as slavery, but it did work well when practised by good Christian thinking plantation owners, as does industrialism when fostered by such a prudent man as Henry Ford.

    As a slave owner and very devout Christian, Nicholas knew full well he was not only entitled and but also obligated to keep his slaves employed and put to useful work. Work which allowed him to support them and to keep them from straying from the path and to keep them in their old age. He knew full well that many of them were anything but diligent and that freeing them would plunge them into a chaos like that which followed the Civil War; and he like Lincoln saw in the Declaration of Independence a cry for freedom but unlike Lincoln one for more freedom than the reality of life could ever deem prudent for all humanity. For it took four generations for the diligent ones to pull themselves out of poverty, while the chaos of crime, alcohol and drugs is still holding many down. And How many of them who managed to improve themselves by taking jobs for the automobile giants in the 1930's to 60's have been thrown out of work in the decades that followed by big bosses who have decided to open factories elsewhere, first moving factories to the West coast, then to the South and then totally outsourcing. A slave owner could not "lay off" a slave and outsource to work to cheaper labor, he had to find work for his slaves as long as they could work and take care of him after that with what the younger slave produced: a social structure that fed and clothed and cared for them all their lifes and kept them out of harms way and out of mischief. The slaves knew why they did not want to have anything to do with John Brown's insurrection at Harper's Ferry: it threatened their livelihood and offered nothing but a nebulous freedom from all that had been their security.

    The Northern industrialists who financed Lincoln's campaign sold uniforms and weapons for far more profit and then got a lot of cheap labor after the war and their grandchildren have been rather indifferent to their social obligations. But if a more moderate policy had been pursued the mechanization of agriculture in the 1870's, 80's and 90's would have made slavery obsolete anyway. The slave owners would have had to free their slaves anyway or start the industrialisation of the South that did not begin until a hundred years later because the Civil War so impoverished the South. Despite his opposition to the Declaration of Independence the Old Treasurer continued in office and continued to support the revolution, for taxation without representation was tyranny. His son, Wilson Cary Nicholas, commanded Washington's Life Guard all through the Revolution The difference of opinion was "just" a legal principal that might have saved a hundred thousand lives four score and eighty years down the road, not to mention the millions upon millions spent to destroy the South that brought no visible improvement for anyone except a few industrialists.
     

    Sources:
    Birth - Virginia Magazines
    Marriage - idem
    Death - idem
    Children and lives: Some Prominent Virginia Familes, in four volumes, Vol. II. Edward Jaquelin – Martha Cary their descendents and collateral families, by Louise Pecquet du Beliet
    http://www.colonialwilliamsburg.com/Almanack/people/bios/
    http://homepages.rootsweb.com/~marshall/esmd58.htm
    www.familysearch.org
    Biography of Patrick Henry
    The historical evaluation is the homegrown BS of yours truly HE1-2

    Appendix to Page Ni7

    1. Colonel George Nicholas (See Ni6)

    2.Wilson Cary Nicho1as (Ni6-2) was a Governor of Virginia. He died in 1820.
    In 1761  he married Margaret Smith  a sister of Samuel Smith of Baltimore  another of whose sisters was Mary Smith (Sm6) who married Colonel George Nicholas (Ni6).

    (Note: The children of Cary Ann Nicholas (Ni4-) (Mrs. Rudolph Fink) daughter of Judge S. S. Nicholas (Ni5) are descended from both Colonel George Nicholas (Ni6) and Wilson Cary Nicholas (Ni6-2).
    3. A daughter of Robert Carter Nicholas (Ni7) named Elizabeth (Ni6-1?) married Edmund Jennings Randolph Governor of Virginia on August 29, 1776. Her sister, Sarah Nicholas (Ni6-9) married (1752?) John H. Norton of Winchester, Virginia, and was the ancestress of the Episcopal minister John Nicholas Norton for whom the well known Norton Infirmary, of Louisville was named.

    Data from www.famousamericans.net/robertcarternicholas/:

    NICHOLAS, Robert Carter, statesman, born in Hanover, Virginia, in 1715; died there in 1780.  His father, Dr. George Nicholas, emigrated to Virginia about 1700. After graduation at William and Mary College, the Robert studied law, and practiced with much success. He represented James City in the house of burgesses, in which he continued until the house of delegates was organized in 1777, and was a member of this body until 1779, when he was appointed a judge of the high court of chancery, and consequently of the court of appeals.

    From 1764 till 1776 he was a conspicuous member of the party of which Richard Bland, Peyton Randolph, and Edmund Pendleton were leaders, and in 1774 voted against the stamp-act resolutions of Patrick Henry. From 1766 till 1777 he was treasurer of the colony, and in 1773 he was a member of the committee of correspondence. He was also a member of all of the important conventions, and president pro tempore of the one that met in July, 1775.

    His son, George Nicholas, statesman, born in Hanover, Virginia, about 1755 ; died in Kentucky in 1799, was graduated at William and Mary in 1772, was major of the 2d Virginia regiment in 1777, and afterward became colonel. He was an active member of the convention that ratified the Federal constitution, and was a member of the house of delegates, in whose deliberations he had great influence. In 1790 he removed to Kentucky, and was chosen a member of the convention that framed the constitution of that state, meeting at Danville, Kentucky, on 1 April, 1792. The constitution was largely the work of Mr. Nicholas. He was the first attorney-general of Kentucky.--Another son, Wilson Cary, governor of Virginia, born in Hanover, Virginia, about 1757; died in Milton, Virginia, 10 October, 1820, was graduated at William and Mary college. He was an officer in the Revolutionary army, and commanded Washington's life-guard until it was disbanded in 1783. He was a member of the convention that ratified the constitution of the United States, and was elected a United States senator, in place of Henry Tazewell, as a Democrat, serving from 3 January, 1800, till his resignation, 17 December, 1804. He was collector of the ports of Norfolk and Portsmouth in 1804-'7.

    Henry S. Randall, in his life of Jefferson, says of him and his brothers  " No Virginia family contributed more to Mr. Jefferson's personal success than the powerful family of the Nicholases -- powerful in talents, powerful in probity, powerful in their numbers and union. On every page of Mr. Jefferson's political history the names of George, John, Wilson Cary. and Philip Norborne Nicholas are written."

    --Another son, John Nicholas, jurist, born in Williamsburg, Virginia, 19 January, 1761" died in Geneva, New York, 31 December, 1819, was elected to congress as a Democrat, serving from 2 December, 1793, till 3 March, 1801. He removed to Geneva, New York, in 1803, and devoted himself to agricultural pursuits. From 1806 till 1809 he was a state senator, and he was first judge of the court of common pleas in Ontario county from 1806 until his death. He was elected to congress, serving from 26 October, 1807, till 27 November, 1809, and from 1814 till 1817 he was governor of Virginia.

    -Another son, Philip Norborne Nicholas, jurist, born in Williamsburg, Virginia, in 1773; died in Richmond, Virginia, 18 August, 1849, was named for Philip Norborne Berkeley, Baron de Botetourt. He became a lawyer at an early age, and before reaching his twenty-first year was appointed attorney-general of Virginia. For many years he was president of the Farmers' bank of Virginia, and was judge of the general court of Virginia from about 1823 till his death. He was largely interested in the politics of his state, and was a member of the " Richmond Junta," which, with the "Richmond Enquirer," influenced to a great extent the Democratic party in the state of Virginia and in the country at large. He strongly opposed the doctrine of nullification in a series of able articles in the "Richmond Enquirer," signed "Agricola."

    --George's son, Robert Carter Nicholas, senator, born in Hanover, Virginia, about 1793 ; died in Terrebonne parish, Louisiana, 24 December, 1857, was graduated at William and Mary in 1810. He served in the war of 1812, and was appointed captain in the 20th infantry on 12 March, 1812, major of the 12th infantry, 3 March, 1813, and lieutenant-colonel of the 44th infantry, 20 August, 1814. He was transferred to the 30th infantry on 14 November, 1814, and served on the Canadiem frontier. He was mustered out in June, 1815, and removed to Louisiana, where he engaged in sugar-planting. He was charge d'affaires to Naples, subsequently became secretary of state of Louisiana, and was elected a United States senator, as a Democrat, serving from 4 March, 1836, till 3 March, 1841. In 1851 he became superintendent of public instruction in Louisiana.--Another son of George, Samuel Smith, jurist, born in Lexington, Kentucky, 1796; died in Louisville, Kentucky, 27 November, 1869, was first a met-chant in New Orleans, and afterward practised law with success in Louisville, Kentucky In 1831 he was appointed judge of the court of appeals, and he was subsequently a member of the state legislature. He assisted in preparing the revised code of Kentucky, and was the author of a series of essays on "Constitutional Law" (Louisville, about 1857).


    3 pound bank note signed by Robert Carter Nicholas, Peyton Randolph and John Blair


    Backside of above bank note.
     


    5 pound note autographed by Robert Carter Nicholas on the back side.

    Data from http://homepages.rootsweb.com/~marshall/esmd58.htm

    Nicholas Family

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
     

                          Generation One

    1.  Dr. George Nicholas; b. 1695; m. Elizabeth Carter, daughter of
    Robert Carter and Judith Armistead, 1724; 2nd husband; d. 1734.
         He was a physician.

         Elizabeth Carter was born in 1692 at 'Corotoman', Lancaster Co.,
    VA. She married Hon. Nathaniel Burwell, son of Hon. Lewis Burwell and
    Abigail Smith, in 1709; 1st husband. She died in 1734.
         Known children of Dr. George Nicholas and Elizabeth Carter were
    as follows:
                     i. John Nicholas; b. "1-19-1726" at Virginia; m.
                        Martha Fry, daughter of Col. Joshua Fry, 1758.
                    ii. George Nicholas; b. 1726; m. Elizabeth Ruffin; d.
                        1771.
                        He and Elizabeth Ruffin had 6 children.
         2.        iii. Robert Carter Nicholas, b. "1-28-1728" at
                        Virginia; m. Ann Cary.
     

                          Generation Two

    2.  Robert Carter Nicholas (George1); b. "1-28-1728" at Virginia; m.
    Ann Cary, daughter of Col. Wilson Cary and Sarah Pate, 1751; d. 8
    Sep 1780 at Virginia.
         He was graduated at William and Mary College, Williamsburg, VA.
    He was a judge. He was Treasurer of the Colony at Virginia.
         Ann Cary was born in 1735. She resided at 'Ceeleys', Elizabeth
    City Co., VA. She died in 1786.
         Known children of Robert Carter Nicholas and Ann Cary were as
    follows:
         3.          i. Sarah Nicholas, b. 1752 at Frederick Co., VA; m.
                        John Hatley Norton.
                    ii. Elizabeth Carter Nicholas; b. 1753; m. Gov. Edmund
                       Jennings Randolph, son of John Randolph, 1776; d.
                        1810.
                   iii. Gov. George Nicholas; b. 1754 at Virginia; m. Mary
                        Smith 1778; d. 1799 at Kentucky.
                        He was Governor of Kentucky.
                    iv. John Nicholas; b. 1756; m. Ann Rose Lawson; d.
                        1820.
                        He resided at New York, NY.
                     v. Mary Nicholas; b. 1759; d. 1796; unmarried.
                    vi. Gov. Wilson Cary Nicholas; b. 31 Jan 1761 at
                        Williamsburg, VA; m. Margaret Smith, daughter of
                        John Smith, 1785; d. 10 Jan 1820 at the home of
                        Thomas Jefferson Randolph at age 58; bur. at
                        Monticello, VA.
                        He and Margaret Smith resided at 'Mt. Warden',
                        Albemarle Co., VA. He was Governor between 1814
                        and 1816 at Virginia.
                   vii. Judith Nicholas; b. 1765; d. infancy.
                  viii. Lewis Nicholas; b. 1766; m. Frances Harris; d.
                        1840.
                        He resided at Albemarle Co., VA.
                    ix. Robert Nicholas; b. 1768; d. infancy.
                     x. Philip Norborne Nicholas; b. 1776; m. Mary Spear;
                        1st wife; m. Maria Carter Byrd, daughter of Thomas
                        Taylor Byrd and Mary Anne Armistead, 1823; 2nd
                        wife; d. 1849.
                        He was a judge. He resided at Richmond, VA.
     

                         Generation Three

    3.  Sarah Nicholas (Robert2, George1); b. 1752 at Frederick Co., VA;
    m. John Hatley Norton, son of John Norton and Courtenay Walker, 30 Jan
    1772 at James City, VA; 1st wife.

         John Hatley Norton was born on 4 Sep 1745 at Yorktown, VA. He
    resided at York Co., VA. He resided at Winchester, VA. He was Justice
    at York Co., VA. He was a merchant. He married Catherine Bush,
    daughter of Philip Bush and Catherine Clough; 2nd wife, 1st husband.
    He died in 1797 at Winchester, VA.

    Go to Elizabeth Starr Marshall
    Go to Jaquelin Ambler Marshall III
    Go to Sarah Nicholas

    Go to Marshall Genealogy Family Index
    Go to Marshall Genealogy Bibliography
    Go to Marshall Genealogy Page

    DAta from http://www.familysearch.org/

    Elizabeth NICHOLAS (AFN: 8MRC-W4)  Pedigree
     Sex:  F Family
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Event(s):
     Birth:   11 Aug 1752
      Of Gloucester, Gloucester, Virginia
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Parents:
     Father:  Robert Carter NICHOLAS (AFN: 8MSK-RC)  Family
     Mother:  Ann CARY (AFN: 8MSK-SJ)
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Marriage(s):
     Spouse:  Edmund Jennings RANDOLPH (AFN: 8MRC-VX)  Family
     Marriage:  29 Aug 1776
      , , Va